Fiber Rich Foods

A variety of childhood health problems have been linked to low fiber consumption, including type 2 diabetes, obesity, and constipation. A high fiber diet may help, but it is important to note the differences between soluble and insoluble fiber in order to use them to your child’s advantage.

The slow passage of soluble fiber through the digestive system allows more time for food to be absorbed. This makes you feel fuller and prevents overeating. Soluble fiber helps to lower cholesterol and maintain steady blood sugar as well.

Fiber Dietary Requirements

Gender/Age Fiber(grams)
1-3 years 19
4-8 years 25
9-13 years Female 26
9-13 years Male 31
14-18 years Female 29
14-18 years Male 38

Foods with fiber

Fruits Serving Size Total Fiber(grams)
Raspberries 1 cup 8.0
Pear 1 medium 5.5
Apple 1 medium 4.4
Banana 1 medium 3.1
Figs, dried 2 medium 1.6
Raisins 1 ounce (60 raisins) 1.0
Vegetables Serving Size Total Fiber(grams)
Artichoke, cooked 1 medium 10.3
Sweet corn, cooked 1 cup 4.0
Potato, with skin, baked 1 small 3.0
Tomato paste 1/4 cup 2.7
Carrot, raw 1 medium 1.7
Green peas, cooked 1 cup 8.8
Legumes,nuts and seeds Serving Size Total Fiber(grams)
Split peas, cooked 1 cup 16.3
Black beans, cooked 1 cup 15.0
Lentils, cooked 1 cup 15.6
Baked beans, cooked 1 cup 10.4
Almonds 1 ounce (23 nuts) 3.5
Pistachio nuts 1 ounce (49 nuts) 2.9
Grains, cereal and pasta Serving Size Total Fiber(grams)
Spaghetti, whole-wheat, cooked 1 cup 6.3
Oat bran muffin 1 medium 5.2
Oatmeal, instant, cooked 1 cup 4.0
Popcorn, air-popped 3 cups 3.5
Brown rice, cooked 1 cup 3.5
Bread, whole-wheat or multigrain 1 slice 1.9